• Yehudit Zicklin-Sidikman

"Consequence: Beyond Resisting Rape," by Loolwa Khazzoom


I can’t believe that this book was written in the late 90’s and that I have never heard about it until now! What??? How did that happen?


Consequence: Beyond Resisting Rape” by Loolwa Khazzoom


I am only sad that the copy I’m reading is not my own because I would be highlighting it non-stop!


Instead, I am going to use this platform to share some and what it means to me.


“Preface: I write this book as a woman who believes that revolution is imperative and that it starts within each of us and our private lives.


I draw from my own life’s experiences of violence, and from my battles against this violence, in the many forms and degrees it has permeated my life.”


“Preface: I write this book as a woman who believes that revolution is imperative and that it starts within each of us and our private lives. I draw from my own life’s experiences of violence, and from my battles against this violence, in the many forms and degrees it has permeated my life.”

As I began my journey into writing my book about my life’s experiences and what I have learned from it, it is fortuitous that I am reading this book right now. It is forcing me to dig deeper into memories of my teenage self and my relationship to men, sex, and body.


Yes, I was sexually assaulted by a member of the clergy in my wonderful, loving, and “healthy” community. No, I did not acknowledge it as rape until I was much older. Actually, not until I was a mother of a tween daughter. Yes, I was twelve. No, I was not responsible for my rape, which as I write it always sounds like a one-time occurrence. I mean, if I read that line (rather than writing it) I would clearly assume it was a one-time event.


It was not. It was 6 years of being “in love” with someone 15 years older than I was, who convinced me that this was normal and okay. Who manipulated my need for love, support, and trust during a very difficult time and used it to gratify his needs. All under the guise of loving me.


Today, we talk a lot about microaggressions. Mostly, in terms of how people of privilege speak from places of bias and stereotypes. Can we have a conversation about microaggressions that affect women every day? Comments on size, looks, and expectations? The never ending pressure to “give more” than you have clearly stated you are interested in giving?


Yes, we have laws that draw the line at what is illegal behavior. And......well, and it does not really solve the problem.

Yes, we have laws that draw the line at what is illegal behavior. And......well, and it does not really solve the problem.


IMHO microaggressions against women are like being pecked to death by roosters.


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