• Yehudit Zicklin-Sidikman

The power of TELL - Creating a "TELL" List



When it comes to the 5 principles of Empowerment Self Defense, THINK, YELL, RUN, FIGHT, TELL, we give equal weight to each. Clearly, in a specific situation, you may use one more than others, or all or only some, but when we teach them, they are equally important.


As I am editing and commenting on a bunch of online videos that are about to launch (everyone keep your fingers crossed or whatever your culture does to bless things) Joanne Factor of Strategic Living said something that was an ah-ha moment for me.


She said, “Make a TELL list.”


TELL is about going and telling someone you trust, who won’t judge you, and will support you, what just happened to you.

TELL is about going and telling someone you trust, who won’t judge you, and will support you, what just happened to you.


What if we took that a bit further? What if we “practiced” TELL just like any of the other skills?


What if we went out and started building a TELL list with people we know and love to see what they think about sexual assault etc.?


Have the conversation before it is needed! Brilliant!


And it could look like this:


“Mom, if something like this [add scenario] ever happened to me how would you react if I told you?”


Or a friend...


“I’ve never had this happen to me, but I am wondering how you would react if I came to you and told you that [add story].”

“I’ve never had this happen to me, but I am wondering how you would react if I came to you and told you that [add story].”


This feels like a wonderful way to practice telling and testing who would be the best people to have on your tell list. It also gives them a chance to think about how they might react, and who knows, it could help them figure out who they could tell and how, if something happens to them, just because you have this conversation with them.


Practicing TELL. Making sure you have people you can talk to before something happens.


I love it!